Atsuo - Drums and Vocals

Wata - Guitar, Keyboards, Vocals

Takeshi - Bass, Guitar, Vocals

Atsuo - Drums and Vocals

Wata - Guitar, Keyboards, Vocals

Takeshi - Bass, Guitar, Vocals

B O R I S 
 
World Wide Management 
Tadashi Hamada - Manager

Label - Sargent House
Marc Jetton & Cathy Pellow - Label 
Jason Adams - Product Manager

Music Licensing - Marc Jetton 

N. American Press - US/THEM Group
Dave Clifford - Publicist 

N. American Booking - Flower Booking
Mahmood Shaikh: - Agent 

European Booking - Odyssey Booking
Vincent  Royers - Agent 


WORLDWIDE $ STORE // UK £ STORE

B
ORISHEAVYROCKS.COM

BORIS / Sargent House Discography

BORIS TOUR DATES

NEWS

Boston live review // Invisible Oranges 

Over the past two decades, Boris have established themselves as one of the most prolific and adventurous bands in heavy music. The Japanese trio’s expansive discography engages with just about every conceivable iteration and combination of drone, doom, sludge, post-rock and noise rock, with left turns into everything from shoegaze and dream pop to a string of collaborations with Merzbow, the closest thing to a mainstream noise musician that exists. While the band has racked up a number of classic releases tied to particular facets of their sound (Flood, their ambitious drone masterpiece and Heavy Rocks, their finest hour as a full-throttle stoner metal band), 2005’s Pink stands out as Boris’ best summative work.

From the gorgeously plaintive opener “Farewell” to the title track’s earworm riffing and the wall of drone that concludes “Just Abandoned Myself,” Pink finds Boris at the peak of their many powers. The disc of unreleased outtakes accompanying this June’s reissue of the record demonstrates the kind of zone the band was in at the time, functioning more as a legitimate companion LP than a one-listen curiosity. In support of the new deluxe edition, and in celebration of the album’s tenth anniversary, the band has embarked on a tour performing Pink in its entirety. In typical Boris fashion, however, that concept isn’t as straightforward in execution as it might sound.

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Live Review // Dallas Observer 

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Mother Earth and Father Boris sharing the same stage: It’s hard to imagine a better soundtrack for the birth of a mountain, or even a planet. And while neither of these appeared within the walls of Trees last night, that might just be because they appeared in some far-flung place instead. Employees of NASA would do well to consider Boris’ current U.S. tour if they should find themselves in needing to explain any interstellar anomalies which might appear in the coming weeks.

Boris are a Japanese metal trio which defies categorization. Each album is a kind of microcosm, a musical biome with its own flora, fauna and weather patterns. The only common denominator is Heaviness. (You know when a band has a $300 fuzz pedal available for sale at the merch table that they’re serious about low frequencies.)

It makes sense, then, to tour with songs from only one album at a time, as Boris is doing this summer: They know their listeners want to experience one of these microcosms in its fully fleshed-out form. For this tour, the album in question is 2006’s Pink, their breakthrough album. It’s possibly their heaviest, a contender for their noisiest and almost certainly their fastest. It starts noise rock (think Japanese Lightning Bolt) and ends doomgaze (think Jesu) with a few turns in between, the whole thing shot through with a darkly psychedelic sensibility.

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Consequence of Sound reviews Boris “Pink (Deluxe Edition)” 

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In 2006, Americans were beginning to see technology become a necessity in a way we had yet to previously. YouTube was barely a thing (but growing quickly), Twitter was born (and seemed like a fad at best), and iPods not only still existed, but consumers had difficulty choosing what frosted color to order them in (who are you really if you purchased the yellow one?). Inventions come and go; 2006 wasn’t special in that regard. But a trend began to form: digital technology expanded the importance of personal branding, using 2D platforms and 3D items to speak on behalf of you in ways clothing and mixtapes couldn’t.

That same year, Boris rolled out Pink, an album that redefined their sound by embracing a similar mentality. You are not your stereotype. If anything, you’re as complicated as you pretend not to be. Boris certainly weren’t trying to mock an internet explosion. Pink is an hour-long record where a band who felt an urge to show their various personalities without separating those styles into multiple LPs.

Thank god, as 2006 needed insight on how to control, package, and deliver deconstructed stereotypes without idolizing someone simply for taking on the challenge. There was sludge metal, there was shoegaze, and there was hard rock. That landmark LP earned its accolades by combining genres both suddenly and seamlessly. To honor its 10th anniversary, the Japanese experimental metal act share an extended EP of cuts from those same recording sessions, and the nine tracks expand that original surge of personality and charisma. Pink shook with the force of a metal act bold enough to combine other elements in headstrong fashion, and a decade later, it holds up with contagious energy and genuinely mesmerizing atmosphere.

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Invisible Oranges interviews Boris 

 

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Japan’s Boris has been around for decades but it is their album Pink, now 10 years old, that is considered their most seminal work. One of the first bands to combine sludge, shoegaze and ambient tones in a crunchy yet accessible way (why yes, even before Deafheaven came onto the scene), Pink helped usher in a new kind of crossover appreciation in metal fans for minimalistic yet heavy sound. It is no coincidence that 2006 was also the first time Boris toured in North America with Sunn O))).

For the records’ 10th anniversary Boris has released a deluxe edition that includes nine unreleased bonus tracks and the band plans to play the complete album in full this summer when on tour with fellow drone OG’s Earth.

I chatted with bassist/guitarist/lead vocalist Takeshi via email (and Japanese to English translator) about their history, the origination of Pink and this summer’s dates (listed below).

Nine unreleased songs is a pretty significant number! Did all of the bonus tracks come from the same writing/recording session?

Yeah, they are all songs recorded during the same sessions and around the same time frame as the songs on the original release. But at the same time, there is some additional editing and arranging that took place to work it out for the release.

Why have you titled them ‘Forbidden Songs’?

Since 2003 we began touring incessantly, and as we matured and were able to accomplish things faster and also got to see the world, our own awareness steadily changed. Among all of this we released Pink. Amidst the constant touring, at that point it became clear to us exactly what we should be doing.

For the original Pink only songs that had that reality–songs that only we could produce, were chosen. “Forbidden Songs” consists of a lot of material that seemed like it was influenced from “something” or that the influence was too obvious, perhaps. So, because we deemed those songs as not “sounds that only we could produce”, at the time we kind of “sealed” them up. I guess that is the meaning behind it.

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